Insight Media Releases Technical White Paper on Quantum Dot Technology

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Insight Media Releases Technical White Paper on Quantum Dot Technology

“Quantum dots are amazing materials with potential we are just beginning to explore,” noted Chris Chinnock, president and founder of Insight Media.  “This white paper profiles the great opportunity that quantum dots offer in displays, especially as displays stretch their color capabilities to achieve the wide BT.2020 color gamut.  But they can also be used in other applications ranging from solar cells, to lighting and bioimaging, so this is clearly a technology to be tracking.”

Click here to download the paper from InsightMedia's website: Quantum Dot White Paper

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3 reasons to get excited about Quantum Dot monitors

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3 reasons to get excited about Quantum Dot monitors

Joel Lee, writing for MakeUseOf.com

The closest competitors to the quantum dot display, at least in terms of picture quality, are plasma displays and OLED displays — and for the most part, quantum dot seems like it will be the winner...With quantum dots, we’ll finally be able to enjoy the features of OLED and plasma displays at LCD prices.

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“That’s freakin’ awesome!”

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“That’s freakin’ awesome!”

"Oh, my." "Wow!" "Whoa!." And at least one “That’s freakin’ awesome!” 

Keep in mind, these aren’t high-school kids, but seasoned professional journalists. The combination of HDR's heightened contrast and dynamics and quantum-dot technology elicited the oohs and ahs, not just the extra pixels in the 3840 x 2160 display.

That's the response from a group of tech journalists reacting to the Quantum Dot-powered Samsung SUHD 9800's awesome HDR image quality according to reviewer Jon Jacobi. Continue reading at TechHive for a full break-down of this year's hottest HDR TV.

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Electronic Design Q&A Part II: A Look at the State of the TV Display Industry

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Electronic Design Q&A Part II: A Look at the State of the TV Display Industry

Part II – Electronic Design's Q&A round table on the state of the TV display industry continues this week with more discussion on Quantum Dots, OLEDs and more from industry experts.

Kim: What technologies have the potential to drive customers to replace their existing TVs?

Yurek: UHD with HDR is highly compelling. We see quantum dots as the key enabling technology for UHD. Quantum-dot TVs deliver a better experience with more of the features that consumers care most about, like high peak luminance and wide color gamut, at a much lower cost than the alternatives. This is because quantum-dot technology is able to leverage all of the existing LCD capex—more than $180 billion—without requiring any changes to the manufacturing process. This makes it very easy to deploy at mainstream scale, so we see quantum dots playing a significant role in UHD TV as the market takes off.

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Electronic Design: What's the Difference Between Display Technologies?

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Electronic Design: What's the Difference Between Display Technologies?

Consumers shopping for a new TV or mobile device today are faced with a wide array of display technology options. From curved vs flat to Quantum Dot vs LED vs OLED vs Micro LED... the choice is no longer as simple as LED vs Plasma. 

Yong-Seog Kim, President, Society for Information Display, is trying to get to the bottom of this question. To do this, he's reached out to the top technology companies behind the latest, greatest display tech to ask them directly "what's the difference between all these new display technologies?" 

A compilation of Dr. Kim's interviews has just been posted at Electronic Design and Nanosys is the featured representative for Quantum Dots.

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CNET's Geoffrey Morrison looks at the future of emissive displays

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CNET's Geoffrey Morrison looks at the future of emissive displays

Geoffrey Morrison, writing for CNET about the state of emissive display technology for TVs, highlighted the promise of printable, electroluminescent Quantum Dot technology to reduce manfuacturing costs and bring emissive displays to even more devices.

Down the road a little farther is the electroluminescent version of this technology. No LED backlight at all; just pixels made of quantum dots. These direct-view quantum dot displays, "QLED" if you will, should offer all the benefits of OLED at even cheaper prices. This is something Samsung is looking into, since they couldn't get OLED to work in large screen sizes.

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Wired on Hisense latest Quantum Dot TV: "70" of HDR Madness"

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Wired on Hisense latest Quantum Dot TV: "70" of HDR Madness"

Tim Moynihan at Wired just took an early look at the latest HDR TV from Hisense, the H10, calling it "a great TV for not a lot of money." The set features Quantum Dot technology from Nanosys, a huge number of dimming zones and HDR10 make it a bargain relative to other, similarly feature-rich TVs:

The flagship 70-inch H10 is a flat-screen (as in, not curved) 4K HDR set. The H10 boasts quantum-dot color enhancement and a full-array backlight system that ramps up to 1,000 nits of luminance. The 320 zones of local dimming (that’s a lot) keep contrast sharp.

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Hisense goes big with new 70" H10 Quantum Dot TV

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Hisense goes big with new 70" H10 Quantum Dot TV

Hisense is getting ready to launch it's biggest-ever TV's including a new flagship 70" HDR model featuring Nanosys Quantum Dot technology. According to Lee Neikirk of Reviewed.com, the new sets will be available early next year and retail for $3,499.

The 70-inch H10 is technically the company's flagship TV. Boasting 320 local dimming zones alongside quantum dot color and THX certification, it's Hisense's biggest challenger to the premium competition from brands like LG, Samsung, and Sony.

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Engadget: Samsung brings quantum dots to its curved gaming monitors

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Engadget: Samsung brings quantum dots to its curved gaming monitors

Daniel Cooper, writing for Engadget:

Samsung has announced a trio of high-end curved gaming monitors that brings its quantum dot technology to the masses. There are two devices, the CFG70, which is available in 24-and-27-inch sizes, as well as a super premium CF791 that packs a 34-inch, 3,440 x 1,400 display. The devices promise to create more immersive gaming experiences that look as good as they possibly could...

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Samsung Interview with Nanosys CEO Jason Hartlove at IFA 2016

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Samsung Interview with Nanosys CEO Jason Hartlove at IFA 2016

Samsung’s exhibition at IFA 2016 showcases how the company is working to redefine the consumer experience. One way is through its new range of Quantum dot SUHD televisions, which offer the ultimate in picture quality, brilliance and energy efficiency.

Nanosys, Inc., the world’s leading supplier of quantum dots and long-time partner of Samsung, has played an integral role in accelerating the development of nano-architected materials for these industry-leading displays.

President and CEO of Nanosys, Jason Hartlove, explained during an interview at IFA 2016 how quantum dots are changing the way we experience television.

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DigitalTrends: Samsung says it's latest TV breakthrough outshines OLED

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DigitalTrends: Samsung says it's latest TV breakthrough outshines OLED

DigitalTrends just posted an in-depth look at how Quantum Dot technology from Nanosys and Samsung is about to change the display industry.

Quantum dots are about to take on a new role, Nanosys CEO Jason Hartlove told Digital Trends at the IFA 2016 tradeshow, after revolutionizing LCD TV technology. And it may put OLED TV squarely in Samsung’s cross-hairs.

To appreciate how Samsung’s promising new TV tech will work, however, we first need a primer on how quantum dots currently work in Samsung’s TV lineup...

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Nanosys Live on Home Theater Geeks

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Nanosys Live on Home Theater Geeks

Nanosys Vice President of R&D Charlie Hotz and Communications Manager Jeff Yurek joined This Week in Tech's Scott Wilkinson on his weekly Home Theater Geeks broadcast this week to talk Quantum Dot TV from QDEF to QLED.

You can watch the whole show here...

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Samsung puts OLED TV on notice with 10 year warranty for screen-burn in

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Samsung puts OLED TV on notice with 10 year warranty for screen-burn in

Unlike Plasma and OLED, Quantum Dot TVs do not suffer from burn-in reliability issues. It's great to see Samsung stand behind their products with a major new warranty like this

Good news, TV fans – Samsung has announced a mega 10-year ‘screen burn’ warranty for its entire range of 2016 SUHD Quantum dot TVs. Samsung Electronics has pledged to repair or exchange TV panels at “no cost to the owner” if any of its new SUHD Quantum dot TVs experience “screen burn-in effect” within the first 10 years after purchase, in what Samsung describes as an “industry-changing warranty”.

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Samsung profit up 17% on strong sales of Quantum Dot TVs

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Samsung profit up 17% on strong sales of Quantum Dot TVs

Samsung posted blow-away second quarter results today with operating profit of nearly $7 billion, up 17% over the year-ago quarter. The results also came in above street consensus of about $6.2 billion. Analysts attributed the gains to better profitability in the smartphone division as well as the hot-selling SUHD TVs with Quantum Dot technology licensed from Nanosys.

According to a report in the Korea Herald, the Quantum Dot TVs helped the consumer electronics division generate over $850 million dollars in profit for the company...

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AVSForum Visits Nanosys

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AVSForum Visits Nanosys

We had a great time hosting AVS Forum as part of a recent Samsung Family tour stop at our Silicon Valley HQ. Great piece here by Mark Henninger, who managed to capture some videos from the event as well:

If you are an AV enthusiast, you have likely heard of quantum dots by now. These nanoscale semiconductor structures—the size of molecules—have optical qualities that are harnessed to vastly expand the color expression available on consumer televisions. During a recent tour of a Nanosys, Inc. facility in Silicon Valley, I had an opportunity to see firsthand how these microscopic particles are manufactured.

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