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CES

Nanosys to Show Color Volume Demo at CES 2017

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Nanosys to Show Color Volume Demo at CES 2017

Chris Chinnock of DisplayDaily recently caught-up with Nanosys CEO Jason Hartlove to learn about the company's CES plans:

To get a jump on our CES coverage, we decided to have a call with Jason Hartlove, CEO of quantum dot supplier, Nanosys, to learn more about their activities, what they will show at CES and their expectations for quantum dot development.

One of the key demos Nanosys will be showcasing in their suite in the Westgate will be a color volume demo...

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Samsung: "We believe quantum dot is the future of display technology”

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Samsung: "We believe quantum dot is the future of display technology”

“We believe quantum dot is the future of display technology,” said Joe Stinziano, executive vice president of the consumer business division at Samsung Electronics.

The newish competitor is quantum dot technology, which Samsung claims can generate visuals that rival OLED screens. Moreover, quantum dot material can enhance lower cost LCD display manufacturing lines with a few adjustments. OLEDs have traditionally been more challenging to make, which contributed to their slow arrival to production model televisions.

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TCL Launches Multiple Quantum Dot TVs at CES with Nanosys Technology

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TCL Launches Multiple Quantum Dot TVs at CES with Nanosys Technology

The QUHD TV series, built on the fundamental innovation of backlight technology, has set a higher standard for next-generation TVs, bringing an end to disputes over what is actually the next-generation TV technology. QUHD TVs, by taking full advantage of the unique quantum technology, far exceed LED TVs in terms of display effects and also surpasses OLED TVs in terms of several key metrics, including definition and color purity.

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DigitalTrends: What the hell are Quantum Dots and why do you want them in your next TV?

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DigitalTrends: What the hell are Quantum Dots and why do you want them in your next TV?

Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF®) ends up sandwiched between a display's backlight and traditional liquid-crystal module (LCM).

Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF®) ends up sandwiched between a display's backlight and traditional liquid-crystal module (LCM).

LED, LCD, OLED, 4K, UHD … the last thing the TV industry needs right now is another techno-acronym. But TV tech being the ever-evolving juggernaut that it is, we were bound to have to embrace new terminology at some point. Turns out, that point is now, and the term — which will be the buzzword de rigeur in 2015 — is quantum dots. Although we’re glad to be spared another acronym, the term “quantum dot” not only fails to explain what the tech does, but the subject matter is pretty heady stuff, too.

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Quantum Dot Showdown Coming to CES 2015?

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Quantum Dot Showdown Coming to CES 2015?

Momentum seems to be building among flat-panel TV manufacturers to offer improved picture quality from LCD panels to provide a less expensive and more easily manufactured alternative to pricey new OLED TVs, which many see as the future standard TV technology.

Among them is flat-panel TV giant Samsung, which marketed a 55-inch OLED set last year, before opting to temporarily step away from the category as it works on developing a new printing method for OLED production.

The results of these efforts are expected to be on display at International CES in January.

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The Register: Samsung slams door on OLED TVs, makes QUANTUM dot LEAP

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The Register: Samsung slams door on OLED TVs, makes QUANTUM dot LEAP

Samsung has said that it intends to focus on UHD TVs using LCD panels augmented by quantum dot technology, instead of pushing OLED as a commercial replacement for LCD. This is the kind of decision that might mean that OLED nevertakes off in the larger form factors.

Kim Hyun-Seok, the head of Samsung’s TV business, told reporters that the firm doesn’t intend to change its OLED strategy this year or next – meaning that it will look to quantum dots to wring the life out of LCD instead of taking the plunge to OLED.

Samsung is planning on showcasing its new quantum dot tech at CES 2015.

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DigitalTrends: Samsung Shelves OLED in favor of Quantum Dot display tech for next generation TVs

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DigitalTrends: Samsung Shelves OLED in favor of Quantum Dot display tech for next generation TVs

According to the CNET report, the company is fighting back by pouring R&D money into Quantum Dot televisions which, like OLEDs, are a self-emitting technology (they can generate their own light).

Quantum Dots are a difficult technology to understand, but their potential benefits are easier to wrap your head around. Think of Quantum Dots as ultra-tiny particles that will make their own light if electricity is applied to them, or if light is shone on them. That color is directly related to their size, and their color production is extremely stable. Presently, Quantum Dots are used to change the color of LEDs into other colors, eliminating the need for a color filter in an LCD planel, and producing more accurate, well-saturated colors, along with purer whites. Unfortunately, they still rely on LED backlights, which means displays using the technology must still be carefully engineered in order to offer other critical picture quality elements, such as deep black levels, and uniformly bright screens.

 

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Display analyst Ken Werner: Quantum Dot displays among CES 2014 surprises and delights

Some of my fellow analysts have been bemoaning a lack of TV, tablet, and cell-phone innovations at CES 2014. Well, either I have lower standards than my colleagues or a keener eye because I saw quite a few things that surprised, delighted, and horrified me. Here are some of them.

Kindle Fire HDX 7 with QDEF (right) is tuned to give better color gamut and much better power consumption.

3M’s Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF) using quantum dots from partner Nanosys is now in a high-volume shipping product. 3M was coy about identifying the customer, but partner Nanosys (which supplies the quantum dots used by 3M) didn’t hesitate. QDEF is being used in Kindle Fire HDX 7.0 and 8.9 inch tablets. The 8.9-inch has a 2560×1600-pixel display withg 339 pixels per inch (ppi), and uses QDEF to increase the color gamut from 60% to 72% NTSC. This is a noticeable although not extreme improvement, but Amazon asked 3M and Nanosys to optimize the system to significantly improve battery life, even if that meant only a modest improvement in gamut. They did. Battery life is substantially improved.

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HDTV Expert on CES 2014: Red really looks like red when viewed with a Quantum Dot backlight

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HDTV Expert on CES 2014: Red really looks like red when viewed with a Quantum Dot backlight

Red – perhaps the most difficult color to reproduce accurately in any flat-screen TV – really looks like red when viewed with a QD backlight. And it’s possible to show many subtle shades of red with this technology.

All you need is a QD film or emitter with arrays of red and green dots, plus a backlight made up of blue LEDs. The blue passes through, while the blue photons “tickle” the red and green dots, causing them to emit their respective colors. It’s also possible to build a direct-illumination display out of quantum dots that would rival OLED TVs.

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CES 2012: Nanosys Redefining "Colorful" In Displays with QDEF Display Technology

CES 2012: Nanosys Redefining "Colorful" In Displays with QDEF Display Technology

For anyone who has looked at an iPad, you probably think that the display is gorgeous. And it is. But it could be even more gorgeous if the colors were spot on. Jeff Yurek of Nanosys met with me at this year's CES to illustrate the difference in the improved quality their technology gives to displays like those on an iPad. And boy is it a difference.

EngineeringTV Video from CES 2012

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EngineeringTV Video from CES 2012

Jeff Yurek of Nanosys talks quantum dot display technology and color gamut with engineeringTV at CES 2012

Jeff Yurek of Nanosys talks quantum dot display technology and color gamut with engineeringTV at CES 2012

Bill Wong of Electronic Design magazine stopped by Nanosys' suite to talk with Jeff Yurek about their innovative QDEF display technology that dramatically improves color quality. Watch the whole thing here.

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CES 2010 - Nanosys Using Nanotechnology to Make

Jason Hartlove, CEO of Nanosys, met with me at CES to talk about the work he and his company is doing to make the colors of LED displays more colorful and attractive with process-ready technology that electronics and lighting companies can easily add to their current LED manufacturing lines. The trick is in nanotechnology, creating nanomaterials out of semiconductor materials to layer over blue LED lights (the most energy efficient LED color), forming better quality white LED light with a range of hues. And the result is far more vivid colors with the same energy efficiency of current LED technology. Using this nanotechnology, the company has figured out how to make LEDs of virtually any hue with a color saturation far greater than current LED-backlit LCD displays, and lighting that has warmer hues.