NanoMarkets Issues Latest Report on Quantum Dots, Says QDs Now a Major Competitive Threat to OLEDs

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NanoMarkets Issues Latest Report on Quantum Dots, Says QDs Now a Major Competitive Threat to OLEDs

New NanoMarkets Report Projects Quantum Dot Market to Reach $5.5 Billion by 2020

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According to “Market Opportunities for Quantum Dots: 2015 to 2022,” a new report from industry analyst firm NanoMarkets, the market for quantum dots (QDs) will leap from around $415 million in 2015 to $5.5 billion in 2020.  NanoMarkets considers 2014 as the breakout year for QDs, which achieved significant penetrations in smaller mobile displays for the first time and have now been firmly established as a significant threat to the future of OLED technology. 

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DigitalTrends: What the hell are Quantum Dots and why do you want them in your next TV?

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DigitalTrends: What the hell are Quantum Dots and why do you want them in your next TV?

Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF®) ends up sandwiched between a display's backlight and traditional liquid-crystal module (LCM).

Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF®) ends up sandwiched between a display's backlight and traditional liquid-crystal module (LCM).

LED, LCD, OLED, 4K, UHD … the last thing the TV industry needs right now is another techno-acronym. But TV tech being the ever-evolving juggernaut that it is, we were bound to have to embrace new terminology at some point. Turns out, that point is now, and the term — which will be the buzzword de rigeur in 2015 — is quantum dots. Although we’re glad to be spared another acronym, the term “quantum dot” not only fails to explain what the tech does, but the subject matter is pretty heady stuff, too.

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ASUS Zenbook NX500 Awarded As an Editor's Choice By Laptop mag for "Stunning" Quantum Dot Display

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ASUS Zenbook NX500 Awarded As an Editor's Choice By Laptop mag for "Stunning" Quantum Dot Display

Laptop Mag review says ASUS Zenbook NX500's Quantum Dot screen is "one of the best on any notebook"

Laptop Mag review says ASUS Zenbook NX500's Quantum Dot screen is "one of the best on any notebook"

The real stunner of the Asus ZenBook NX500 is its 15.6-inch display. At 3840 x 2160 pixels of 4K Ultra HD resolution, this screen is one of the best on any notebook.

ASUS Zenbook Quantum Dot Display.jpg

I watched hours of videos -- movie trailers, vlogs, TV-show clips -- and the Asus' display only made me want to watch more. Details are sharp, colors are bold and bright, and everything feels like it's alive in front of you, just 2 feet in front of your face.

The ZenBook has the same resolution as the Toshiba Satellite P50T; both are higher than the Dell XPS 15 (3200 x 1800p) and the 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display (2880 x 1800p).

The ZenBook NX500's display is also the first 4K touch screen to use 3M Quantum Dot Enhancement Film technology, which dramatically widens the range of colors it can achieve. Asus claims the ZenBook NX500 can reach 146 percent of the sRGB color gamut, and in our test, it came close, measuring 140.6 percent. That blows the category average of 80 percent out of the water, and even the Satellite P50T, with its good score of 98.6 percent.

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Bob Raikes calls the ASUS Zenbook NX500 with QDEF "the best notebook display I have ever seen"

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Bob Raikes calls the ASUS Zenbook NX500 with QDEF "the best notebook display I have ever seen"

Inflection Points in the TV and Notebook Markets

Analysts are always looking for inflection points – moments when lines on charts start to move in different directions. I spotted a couple in the last week.

The Asus NX500 uses Quantum Dots to deliver a wide colour gamut

The Asus NX500 uses Quantum Dots to deliver a wide colour gamut

A small one, probably, was the first notebook to use Quantum Dots, the Asus NX500. A prototype of the unit was shown by 3M at the SID Display Week event in June of this year and the UltraHD resolution, quantum dots and optical bonding on the unit made it, without question, the best notebook display I have ever seen, by some distance. The product is a high end one and it’s unlikely to have an impact in terms of volume on the market, but to see a notebook (that I’d be happy to carry) without a compromised display was a pleasure. The enhanced efficiency of the QD technology helps Asus to avoid limiting the gamut of its display to minimise power consumption.

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Asus Ships Notebook With Nanosys QDEF Tech

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Asus Ships Notebook With Nanosys QDEF Tech

ASUS Zenbook NX500 featuring Nanosys QDEF color enhancing Quantum Dot display technology for vivid colors, high brightness and long battery life.

Asus began shipping its Zenbook NX500 to retail stores Wednesday, offering 3M’s Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF) technology for expanded color depth over traditional LED backlit LCD screens. 3M, which along with Nanosys developed the QDEF technology used in the notebook, said the Zenbook NX500 is “the first commercialized notebook PC to leverage this new color enhancing technology.”

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Quantum Dots and the Cinema Revolution

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Quantum Dots and the Cinema Revolution

Raw Quantum Dots stimulated by a blue light source at Nanosys headquarters in Milpitas, CA

The enhanced color palette extends the emotional effect colors can have on the consumer. One way to extend this palette is to introduce light-emitting nano crystals called quantum dots into displays. The market is $25 million, but is expected to be $100 billion by 2020 for lighting and displays. If there’s wide-spread adoption by TV makers, it could contribute to the growing market for quantum dots.

Nanosys Inc. is making quantum dot technology that may at first sound like a science project, but their headquarters in Milpitas, CA is outfitted with a manufacturing facility (which I wasn’t allowed into with my camera) and a demo lab that shows off the screen that is behind the improvement in color in the displays in the room.

Jeff Yurek, communications manager at Nanosys, said “with quantum dots we can make displays that are more power efficient, which means you have have a smaller battery. The displays are easier to read outside. Another property of quantum dots is that they emit really pure colors.”

Just by looking at the screens, it is clear that more color is being emitted than the standard TV screen (which the placed right next to it for comparison).

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Digital Trends: ASUS Zenbook NX500 ups the ante with Quantum Dot display featuring Nanosys QDEF tech

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Digital Trends: ASUS Zenbook NX500 ups the ante with Quantum Dot display featuring Nanosys QDEF tech

Quantum what?
A key trait of the Zenbook’s 4K touchscreen is the use of Quantum Dots, a display technology that improves the accuracy of backlit displays with millions of tiny nano-semiconductors that emit light at specific wavelength when hit with blue light. Though similar in purpose to a traditional LCD color filter, Quantum Dots are more efficient and produce more accurate color.
In tests, the NX500 rendered 100 percent of the sRGB gamut and 96 percent of the AdobeRGB gamut. The latter figure is good enough to tie Samsung’s $2,000 U970HD 32-inch monitor for the best we’ve ever recorded. The Acer Aspire V15 Nitro Black Edition, for comparison, only hits 73 percent of AdobeRGB.

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Nanosys is proud to present the Asus Zenbook NX500

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Nanosys is proud to present the Asus Zenbook NX500

Powerful limited-edition, ultrabook featuring the revolutionary new QDEF™ Quantum Dot color enhancement technology now available

The Asus Zenbook NX500's vivid 4K wide color gamut display allows creative power-users to:

  • Create with 100% of the RGB, sRGB and NTSC color spectrum
  • Impress clients with 50% more color than they expect on a digital screen
  • When design matters and client opinions count, the Asus Zenbook NX500 is the clear, professional choice

Zenbook in the news

  • CNET Review: "Apple's Retina is about to get one-upped."
  • PC World Review: "The laptop’s highlight is a 15.6-inch 4K touchscreen based on quantum dots, a technology that enables vivid, brighter colors on displays."

Seeing is believing

Visit one of our in-store retail displays and see for yourself what Nanosys QDEF™ Quantum Dot Enhancement Film color technology can do for you.


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Quantum Dot Showdown Coming to CES 2015?

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Quantum Dot Showdown Coming to CES 2015?

Momentum seems to be building among flat-panel TV manufacturers to offer improved picture quality from LCD panels to provide a less expensive and more easily manufactured alternative to pricey new OLED TVs, which many see as the future standard TV technology.

Among them is flat-panel TV giant Samsung, which marketed a 55-inch OLED set last year, before opting to temporarily step away from the category as it works on developing a new printing method for OLED production.

The results of these efforts are expected to be on display at International CES in January.

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The Register: Samsung slams door on OLED TVs, makes QUANTUM dot LEAP

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The Register: Samsung slams door on OLED TVs, makes QUANTUM dot LEAP

Samsung has said that it intends to focus on UHD TVs using LCD panels augmented by quantum dot technology, instead of pushing OLED as a commercial replacement for LCD. This is the kind of decision that might mean that OLED nevertakes off in the larger form factors.

Kim Hyun-Seok, the head of Samsung’s TV business, told reporters that the firm doesn’t intend to change its OLED strategy this year or next – meaning that it will look to quantum dots to wring the life out of LCD instead of taking the plunge to OLED.

Samsung is planning on showcasing its new quantum dot tech at CES 2015.

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Future Markets: Global Quantum Dot Market to hit $7 billion by 2024

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Future Markets: Global Quantum Dot Market to hit $7 billion by 2024

Quantum Dots in solution. Image source, Future Markets: http://www.futuremarketsinc.com/the-global-market-for-quantum-dots-2/#prettyPhoto

Quantum dots market will grow in next 18 months in consumer electronics

The current market for companies selling quantum dots is between $25 million (conservative) and $48 million (optimistic) in revenues, with the QD-enabled product market in excess of this. Revenues for quantum dot-enhanced products are potentially upwards of $7 billion by 2024 across displays, solid-state lighting, solar, biomedical, anti-counterfeiting and sensors sectors. Lighting and displays each represent potentially $100 billion global markets by 2020, representing a significant opportunity for quantum dot components.

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DigitalTrends: Samsung Shelves OLED in favor of Quantum Dot display tech for next generation TVs

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DigitalTrends: Samsung Shelves OLED in favor of Quantum Dot display tech for next generation TVs

According to the CNET report, the company is fighting back by pouring R&D money into Quantum Dot televisions which, like OLEDs, are a self-emitting technology (they can generate their own light).

Quantum Dots are a difficult technology to understand, but their potential benefits are easier to wrap your head around. Think of Quantum Dots as ultra-tiny particles that will make their own light if electricity is applied to them, or if light is shone on them. That color is directly related to their size, and their color production is extremely stable. Presently, Quantum Dots are used to change the color of LEDs into other colors, eliminating the need for a color filter in an LCD planel, and producing more accurate, well-saturated colors, along with purer whites. Unfortunately, they still rely on LED backlights, which means displays using the technology must still be carefully engineered in order to offer other critical picture quality elements, such as deep black levels, and uniformly bright screens.

 

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Image Science Foundation Unravels 4K: Does Color Trump Resolution?

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Image Science Foundation Unravels 4K: Does Color Trump Resolution?

Taking a step back from all of the 4K enthusiasm is Joel Silver, president of the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF) and one of the A/V industry’s preeminent video experts. For well over a year, Silver has been cautioning installers that there are other fundamentals in place that should take a higher priority than resolution...

Underscoring what is happening in the video world, Silver emphasizes that 4K is just the first part of a new system. “Frankly [4K] is the least impressive part of the roll-out,” he boasts.

According to Silver, the underpublicized part of the impending video industry’s format updates is the expanded color gamut that could become a part of their final specification.

“The 2020 color space (the International Telecommunications Union Radio Communications ITU-R BT.2020 recommendation) is going to be great for laser color space, but it will be difficult for older TVs.”

“Flat-panel TVs will be expensive,” he continues. “The broadcast space already uses [the spec]. I have a 17-inch HP laptop that was part of a venture with DreamWorks and it includes Rec 709 capabilities and the Adobe Color Space that is much better than HD. The laptop also does DCI (Digital Cinema Initiatives).”

“I can in a two-minute demo show pictures in three different color spaces. Improvements in color gamut are instantaneously superior to the average viewer. Showing Adobe Color Space over Rec 709 is noticeable. Glancing at 4K, the average person doesn’t see [a noticeable difference] because it is just resolution.”

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Reviewed.com: Are Quantum Dots the Next Big Thing in TV Tech?

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Reviewed.com: Are Quantum Dots the Next Big Thing in TV Tech?

Colorful Quantum Dots in solution. Image credit: Flickr user "clancefield" (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

LCD picture quality may soon take a quantum leap.

You probably don't spend much time operating on the quantum level—at least not consciously. But soon, your TV might. 

Earlier this week, LG Electronics announced a plan to implement quantum dot technology in its 2015 lineup of LCD televisions. With quantum dot technology, LG hopes to bridge the gap between the death of plasma and the viability of OLED.

LG's Jung Do-hyun confirmed that the company will pursue "a dual-track strategy" with quantum dot and OLED tech, according to a report by Reuters. In the battle for the best picture, LG "has no choice but to release quantum dot TVs to make sure it doesn't lose ground to Samsung while OLED continues to develop," claims HDC fund manager Park Jung-hoon.

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DisplayDaily: Real colors aren’t all the colors content creators want to show: How about the red of a light saber?

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DisplayDaily: Real colors aren’t all the colors content creators want to show: How about the red of a light saber?

Nanosys believes that by adjusting the blue filter on LCDs, they can reach 97% of the BT.2020 gamut

Think of this as “Part 2” of my last Display Daily on September 10th, where I discussed Canon and its upcoming support for ITU-R BT.2020. In that DD, I said, “lamps, LEDs and laser/phosphor systems simply cannot make the full [BT.2020] color gamut”.

Nanosys believes that by adjusting the blue filter on LCDs, they can reach 97% of the BT.2020 gamut

I heard from Jeff Yurek, Corporate Communications Manager at Nanosys Inc (Milpitas, CA). Nanosys and their quantum dots (QDs) can’t do it either, but Yurek says they can come close. Currently, Yurek says they can do 91% of the BT.2020 color gamut with the standard color filters on the LCD. He believes they can do up to 97% of the BT.2020 color gamut with their current quantum dots and optimizing only the blue color filter used on LCD panels.

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Color Innovation: Quantum Dot displays and new standards for the AV industry

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Color Innovation: Quantum Dot displays and new standards for the AV industry

I was on the road with an AV reseller/partner recently who asked me what companies (excluding my own) I think are the most exciting in the AV space. My answer surprised her – Nanosys and 3M (she’d never heard of Nanosys and still viewed 3M though the lens of their legacy projection line). So why these companies?  They are at the forefront of an interesting new display technology that has the potential to improve display image quality in a dramatic way – Quantum Dots.

Haven’t heard about them? They were probably the hottest topic at last year’s SID conference, and they are already the basis for the display on the Kindle Fire HDX. Customers are increasingly demanding color accuracy for a broader range of colors on their displays. After all, if I spend $5,000 on my new 4K display for my product design collaboration center, Coca-Cola red better be just that – Coca-Cola red. The same holds true for engineering work, seismic data that could help me find the next great oil reserve…the list goes on. Quantum dots may be able to deliver a new level of color quality while reducing energy use and cost of ownership for the display itself.

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Discover the Power of True Color with Hisense and Nanosys at IFA 2014

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Discover the Power of True Color with Hisense and Nanosys at IFA 2014

Hisense's new XT910 85" UHD Quantum Dot TV, featuring Nanosys QDEF technology on display at IFA 2014 in Berlin, Germany. 

Hisense is showing off their new line of Quantum Dot enhanced UHD TV's this week at IFA 2014 in Berlin, Germany. The company is planning to release a new lineup of UHD TV's featuring QDEF technology from Nanosys and 3M in Q1 2015. Led by the world's largest Quantum Dot TV, the 85" XT910, the sets will deliver 100% NTSC color gamut, Ultra High Definition 4K resolution and deep blacks with dynamic direct backlighting.

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