Quantum Dot Showdown Coming to CES 2015?

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Quantum Dot Showdown Coming to CES 2015?

Momentum seems to be building among flat-panel TV manufacturers to offer improved picture quality from LCD panels to provide a less expensive and more easily manufactured alternative to pricey new OLED TVs, which many see as the future standard TV technology.

Among them is flat-panel TV giant Samsung, which marketed a 55-inch OLED set last year, before opting to temporarily step away from the category as it works on developing a new printing method for OLED production.

The results of these efforts are expected to be on display at International CES in January.

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The Register: Samsung slams door on OLED TVs, makes QUANTUM dot LEAP

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The Register: Samsung slams door on OLED TVs, makes QUANTUM dot LEAP

Samsung has said that it intends to focus on UHD TVs using LCD panels augmented by quantum dot technology, instead of pushing OLED as a commercial replacement for LCD. This is the kind of decision that might mean that OLED nevertakes off in the larger form factors.

Kim Hyun-Seok, the head of Samsung’s TV business, told reporters that the firm doesn’t intend to change its OLED strategy this year or next – meaning that it will look to quantum dots to wring the life out of LCD instead of taking the plunge to OLED.

Samsung is planning on showcasing its new quantum dot tech at CES 2015.

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Future Markets: Global Quantum Dot Market to hit $7 billion by 2024

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Future Markets: Global Quantum Dot Market to hit $7 billion by 2024

Quantum Dots in solution. Image source, Future Markets: http://www.futuremarketsinc.com/the-global-market-for-quantum-dots-2/#prettyPhoto

Quantum dots market will grow in next 18 months in consumer electronics

The current market for companies selling quantum dots is between $25 million (conservative) and $48 million (optimistic) in revenues, with the QD-enabled product market in excess of this. Revenues for quantum dot-enhanced products are potentially upwards of $7 billion by 2024 across displays, solid-state lighting, solar, biomedical, anti-counterfeiting and sensors sectors. Lighting and displays each represent potentially $100 billion global markets by 2020, representing a significant opportunity for quantum dot components.

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DigitalTrends: Samsung Shelves OLED in favor of Quantum Dot display tech for next generation TVs

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DigitalTrends: Samsung Shelves OLED in favor of Quantum Dot display tech for next generation TVs

According to the CNET report, the company is fighting back by pouring R&D money into Quantum Dot televisions which, like OLEDs, are a self-emitting technology (they can generate their own light).

Quantum Dots are a difficult technology to understand, but their potential benefits are easier to wrap your head around. Think of Quantum Dots as ultra-tiny particles that will make their own light if electricity is applied to them, or if light is shone on them. That color is directly related to their size, and their color production is extremely stable. Presently, Quantum Dots are used to change the color of LEDs into other colors, eliminating the need for a color filter in an LCD planel, and producing more accurate, well-saturated colors, along with purer whites. Unfortunately, they still rely on LED backlights, which means displays using the technology must still be carefully engineered in order to offer other critical picture quality elements, such as deep black levels, and uniformly bright screens.

 

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Image Science Foundation Unravels 4K: Does Color Trump Resolution?

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Image Science Foundation Unravels 4K: Does Color Trump Resolution?

Taking a step back from all of the 4K enthusiasm is Joel Silver, president of the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF) and one of the A/V industry’s preeminent video experts. For well over a year, Silver has been cautioning installers that there are other fundamentals in place that should take a higher priority than resolution...

Underscoring what is happening in the video world, Silver emphasizes that 4K is just the first part of a new system. “Frankly [4K] is the least impressive part of the roll-out,” he boasts.

According to Silver, the underpublicized part of the impending video industry’s format updates is the expanded color gamut that could become a part of their final specification.

“The 2020 color space (the International Telecommunications Union Radio Communications ITU-R BT.2020 recommendation) is going to be great for laser color space, but it will be difficult for older TVs.”

“Flat-panel TVs will be expensive,” he continues. “The broadcast space already uses [the spec]. I have a 17-inch HP laptop that was part of a venture with DreamWorks and it includes Rec 709 capabilities and the Adobe Color Space that is much better than HD. The laptop also does DCI (Digital Cinema Initiatives).”

“I can in a two-minute demo show pictures in three different color spaces. Improvements in color gamut are instantaneously superior to the average viewer. Showing Adobe Color Space over Rec 709 is noticeable. Glancing at 4K, the average person doesn’t see [a noticeable difference] because it is just resolution.”

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Reviewed.com: Are Quantum Dots the Next Big Thing in TV Tech?

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Reviewed.com: Are Quantum Dots the Next Big Thing in TV Tech?

Colorful Quantum Dots in solution. Image credit: Flickr user "clancefield" (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

LCD picture quality may soon take a quantum leap.

You probably don't spend much time operating on the quantum level—at least not consciously. But soon, your TV might. 

Earlier this week, LG Electronics announced a plan to implement quantum dot technology in its 2015 lineup of LCD televisions. With quantum dot technology, LG hopes to bridge the gap between the death of plasma and the viability of OLED.

LG's Jung Do-hyun confirmed that the company will pursue "a dual-track strategy" with quantum dot and OLED tech, according to a report by Reuters. In the battle for the best picture, LG "has no choice but to release quantum dot TVs to make sure it doesn't lose ground to Samsung while OLED continues to develop," claims HDC fund manager Park Jung-hoon.

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DisplayDaily: Real colors aren’t all the colors content creators want to show: How about the red of a light saber?

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DisplayDaily: Real colors aren’t all the colors content creators want to show: How about the red of a light saber?

Nanosys believes that by adjusting the blue filter on LCDs, they can reach 97% of the BT.2020 gamut

Think of this as “Part 2” of my last Display Daily on September 10th, where I discussed Canon and its upcoming support for ITU-R BT.2020. In that DD, I said, “lamps, LEDs and laser/phosphor systems simply cannot make the full [BT.2020] color gamut”.

Nanosys believes that by adjusting the blue filter on LCDs, they can reach 97% of the BT.2020 gamut

I heard from Jeff Yurek, Corporate Communications Manager at Nanosys Inc (Milpitas, CA). Nanosys and their quantum dots (QDs) can’t do it either, but Yurek says they can come close. Currently, Yurek says they can do 91% of the BT.2020 color gamut with the standard color filters on the LCD. He believes they can do up to 97% of the BT.2020 color gamut with their current quantum dots and optimizing only the blue color filter used on LCD panels.

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Color Innovation: Quantum Dot displays and new standards for the AV industry

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Color Innovation: Quantum Dot displays and new standards for the AV industry

I was on the road with an AV reseller/partner recently who asked me what companies (excluding my own) I think are the most exciting in the AV space. My answer surprised her – Nanosys and 3M (she’d never heard of Nanosys and still viewed 3M though the lens of their legacy projection line). So why these companies?  They are at the forefront of an interesting new display technology that has the potential to improve display image quality in a dramatic way – Quantum Dots.

Haven’t heard about them? They were probably the hottest topic at last year’s SID conference, and they are already the basis for the display on the Kindle Fire HDX. Customers are increasingly demanding color accuracy for a broader range of colors on their displays. After all, if I spend $5,000 on my new 4K display for my product design collaboration center, Coca-Cola red better be just that – Coca-Cola red. The same holds true for engineering work, seismic data that could help me find the next great oil reserve…the list goes on. Quantum dots may be able to deliver a new level of color quality while reducing energy use and cost of ownership for the display itself.

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Discover the Power of True Color with Hisense and Nanosys at IFA 2014

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Discover the Power of True Color with Hisense and Nanosys at IFA 2014

Hisense's new XT910 85" UHD Quantum Dot TV, featuring Nanosys QDEF technology on display at IFA 2014 in Berlin, Germany. 

Hisense is showing off their new line of Quantum Dot enhanced UHD TV's this week at IFA 2014 in Berlin, Germany. The company is planning to release a new lineup of UHD TV's featuring QDEF technology from Nanosys and 3M in Q1 2015. Led by the world's largest Quantum Dot TV, the 85" XT910, the sets will deliver 100% NTSC color gamut, Ultra High Definition 4K resolution and deep blacks with dynamic direct backlighting.

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Will Quantum Dots Dominate Displays?  At Display Week 2014, high-efficiency quantum dots sharpen colors

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Will Quantum Dots Dominate Displays? At Display Week 2014, high-efficiency quantum dots sharpen colors

Dotty Displays: The Kindle Fire HDX is one of the first consumer devices to use displays with quantum dots.

Dotty Displays: The Kindle Fire HDX is one of the first consumer devices to use displays with quantum dots.

Rumpelstiltskin had the admirable ability to convert low-cost straw into valuable gold. Today, display manufacturers are starting to reap the benefits of their own photonic alchemy, converting the light from cheap sources into the precise wavelengths needed for more efficient displays that can show sharper colors.

This magic is accomplished using what are known as quantum dots. These are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit a range of unusual electrical and optical properties, but for decades they were largely confined to research laboratories. Now, quantum dots are being used in mass-produced displays for the consumer market, including such items as Sony flat-screen televisions and Amazon.com’s Kindle Fire HDX e-reader. And the field is still rapidly growing and evolving. At the Display Week 2014 conference of the Society for Information Display this past June in San Diego, quantum dots were a hot topic, both in the exhibit hall and in presented papers; the symposium schedule included three separate sessions dedicated to the subject.

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Reuters: With the help of Milpitas, California-based Nanosys Inc, the Kindle Fire HDX 7 became one of Amazon's best-selling tablets, winning critical acclaim for its vibrant display.

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Reuters: With the help of Milpitas, California-based Nanosys Inc, the Kindle Fire HDX 7 became one of Amazon's best-selling tablets, winning critical acclaim for its vibrant display.

Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 7 featuring a Quantum Dot display from Nanosys and 3M

Aug 13 (Reuters) - When Amazon.com Inc was developing its most advanced tablet to date, it asked a little-known company to solve a tricky problem with the screen: how to produce rich colors without draining battery life.

With the help of Milpitas, California-based Nanosys Inc, the Kindle Fire HDX 7 became one of Amazon's best-selling tablets, winning critical acclaim for its vibrant display.

The answer? Quantum dots, which are semiconductor crystals 10,000 times finer than a human hair. They convert electrical energy into light and can be manipulated to produce precise colors.

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DisplaySearch Expects Rising Use of Quantum Dot Displays, Especially for Smartphones and Tablet PCs

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DisplaySearch Expects Rising Use of Quantum Dot Displays, Especially for Smartphones and Tablet PCs

Quantum Dot Display market penetration by application

SANTA CLARA, CALIF., July 8, 2014—With increasing competition from AMOLED, TFT LCD display manufacturers are beginning to look to quantum dot technology to improve color performance, according to the new Quantum Dot Technology and Market Forecast Report from NPD DisplaySearch. Adoption of quantum dots is expected to be highest in smartphone TFT LCD displays, as pricing is dependent on the area of the display, and competition with AMOLED is most fierce in smartphones. The report forecasts that penetration of quantum dots in smartphone TFT LCDs will be 3% in 2015, growing to 26% in 2020. Penetration in tablet PCs will also be relatively high, with nearly 2% penetration in 2015, growing to 15% in 2020. Quantum dot penetration in LCD TV is expected to be lower, due to the large area of TV displays; NPD DisplaySearch forecasts that less than 1% of LCD TV screens will use quantum dots in 2015, growing to 9% in 2020.

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Apple Retina rivals emerge: Asus display goes 4K

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Apple Retina rivals emerge: Asus display goes 4K

Asus is getting ready to market a 15.6-inch laptop with lots of horsepower and a 4K display. Should Apple be worried?

Nanosys Quantum Dot display in ASUS Zenbook NX500

Apple's Retina is about to get one-upped. Asus has slated a laptop with a 4K display for later this year, while Sharp showed off a prototype 8K display.

The Zenbook NX500's 15.6-inch 3,840x2,160 IPS (in-plane switching) display will use a new technology called Quantum Dots, according to Raymond Soneira, president of DisplayMate Technologies.

"Only the second mobile display to ship with Quantum Dots," Soneira said in an email.

"That increases the color gamut, brightness, and power efficiency all at the same time," he added. And it's a technology that Apple is also rumored to be looking into.

By comparison, Apple's 15.4-inch MacBook Pro has a 2,880x1,800 resolution display (about 3 million pixels less than Asus').

"The display...delivers lifelike color reproduction with a wide color gamut...plus factory-calibrated color temperature, making it perfect for photographers and other professionals who need accurate and consistent color fidelity for their workflows," Asus said in a press release.

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LG, Samsung to mass produce Quantum Dot displays in the second half of 2014

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LG, Samsung to mass produce Quantum Dot displays in the second half of 2014

Quantum Dot display is said to be the next generation display technology which offers a lot of improvements over the traditional OLED displays. This particular technology has been in the market for some years now and many existing manufacturers have already considered integrating these displays onto their devices. However, several challenges like high cost and production constraints have prevented these manufacturers from mass producing QD displays.

But it seems like these challenges have been overcome as the source states that LG as well as Samsung is planning to mass produce Quantum Dot displays in the second half of 2014. So, these displays could easily end up on the next flagship models from the company scheduled to release next year.

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Quantum Dots Enable High Dynamic Range TV

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Quantum Dots Enable High Dynamic Range TV

On the show floor at SID 2014, Nanosys' 10-foot-by-10-foot booth won a Best in Show award in the small exhibit category.  Nanosys, which makes the quantum dots used in 3M's quantum-dot enhancement film (QDEF), was showing two TV sets side-by-side: one was a conventional LCD TV; the second incorporated both QDEF and Dolby's HDR technology, and the image was compelling. But what does QDEF have to do with HDR?

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Tianma Shows Off Quantum Dot Display with Nanosys QDEF at SID 2014

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Tianma Shows Off Quantum Dot Display with Nanosys QDEF at SID 2014

Tianma NLT is also trying to move some of the more advanced display technologies into the commercial and professional markets.  For example, it showed a prototype of a 21.3″ QXGA display using the 3M QDEF quantum dot film for expanded color gamut and it showed a prototype medical monitor (also 21.3″ QXGA) with an Oxide backplane that can help improve uniformity.

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Nanosys QDEF Wins "Best in Show" at 2014 Display Industry Awards for a Third Time

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Nanosys QDEF Wins "Best in Show" at 2014 Display Industry Awards for a Third Time

Nanosys CEO Jason Hartlove (right) and Dolby's Ajit Ninan (center) accepting the Best in Show award from Apple's Wei Chen at the 2014 Display Industry Awards in San Diego

Nanosys Quantum Dot technology is a 3-Time winner of the Society for Information Display's prestigious Best In Show Award. This year the award was given for Nanosys' collaboration with Dolby for a display with a true-to-life experience. The stunning display shows 2,000 nits of peak brightness, DCI-P3 color gamut and 16 F-stops of dynamic range– without drawing more power than a standard display thanks to super-efficient Quantum Dots from Nanosys.

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