Behind the Scenes at the Nanosys Quantum Dot Factory in Silicon Valley

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Behind the Scenes at the Nanosys Quantum Dot Factory in Silicon Valley

Red and Green Quantum Dot materials at Nanosys HQ in Silicon Valley. Photo by Tekla Perry

Next month, Samsung’s first Quantum Dot televisions begins shipping to consumers; Hisense plans to start rolling quantum dot televisions off its manufacturing lines mid-year, and other TV manufacturers, including TCL, Skyworth, ChangHong, Sharp, and LG also have unveiled quantum dot TVsthat will likely come to market soon. Sony introduced a version of the technology in 2013.

Quantum dots, nanoscale semiconductor crystals, turn blue light into narrow-spectrum greens and reds. It’s these narrow wavelengths of light that allow quantum dots to make traditional LED screens produce the brighter and wider range of colors that make quantum dot televisions stand out. (More on how that works here.) But before quantum dots can create brilliant colors, someone has to make the quantum dots. A few companies are doing so, either using their own or licensed technology, including NanocoQD VisionQuantum Materials, and Nanosys. Turns out one of those is doing its manufacturing here in Silicon Valley.

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Samsung's Quantum Dot SUHD TV wins awards in early reviews

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Samsung's Quantum Dot SUHD TV wins awards in early reviews

Samsung SUHD TV licensed Quantum Dot technology from Nanosys

The first reviews are in and they are unanimous– Samsung's new SUHD lineup of UHD TVs brings a major leap forward in image quality. Using Quantum Dot technology licensed from Nanosys, Samsung's latest sets show an unprecedented range of color and dynamic range for a truly stunning picture. Here's what the reviewers have to say:

The Samsung UE65JS9500 is easily the most impressive LED TV we’ve reviewed to date, which is hardly surprising given that it’s kitted out with all the most desirable LCD-enhancing technologies known to videophiles... We’ve downgraded the Panasonic AX802 and Sony X9005B, and made the Samsung UE65JS9500 the sole holder of our “Highly Recommended: Best in Class” award.
— HDTVtest
The [Samsung SUHD] delivers the biggest leap forward in picture quality we’ve seen for years. Truly next-generation stuff that, once experienced, feels almost painful to be without.
— TrustedReviews.com

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HomeTheaterReview: What Quantum Dots Mean to Your Next UHD TV

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HomeTheaterReview: What Quantum Dots Mean to Your Next UHD TV

UHDTV Color broadcast spec rec.2020 is much larger than HDTV's

Since the arrival of the first-generation 4K Ultra HD TVs, you've heard us say that the increased resolution, on its own, may not provide the wow factor that manufacturers need to inspire consumers to upgrade their televisions. At the typical TV screen sizes and at the typical viewing distance, the typical consumer may not be able to see the extra detail. Other potential elements of UHD--namely, better color and contrast--can provide a more obvious improvement. Well, 2015 marks the year that those other potential elements will become a reality, in both UHD TVs and UHD content. At the 2015 International CES, TV manufacturers emphasized two emerging technologies: quantum dots and high dynamic range. Over the next few weeks, we're going to discuss these technologies, along with the current state of HDMI, to give you an idea of where Ultra HD is headed.

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Quantum Dots Market Worth $4.7 Billion by 2020

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Quantum Dots Market Worth $4.7 Billion by 2020

According to a new market research report published by MarketsandMarkets, the Quantum Dot Market is estimated to reach $4,704.86 Million by 2020, at a CAGR of 63.61% from 2014 to 2020.

The quantum dots market is expected to grow at an impressive CAGR rate; it holds a great potential to cater to various industries such as consumer, healthcare among others. The quantum dots technology is used in many applications due to the technological advancement such as low energy consumption, vibrant displays. The quantum dots market is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 63.23% from 2014 to 2020, which includes an in-depth analysis of the market by product, application, material, and geography.

The competitive landscape of the market presents a very interesting picture. The market is witnessing new product launches, large scale collaborations, and agreements and partnerships across the value chain, with a number of tier-one players around the globe.

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PC Mag: ASUS Zenbook's Quantum Dot Display "easily outshines" Apple's Retina

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PC Mag: ASUS Zenbook's Quantum Dot Display "easily outshines" Apple's Retina

The overall design is nice, but once you power on the system, the screen may be the only thing you pay attention to. The 15.6-inch In-Plane Switching (IPS) display has an eye-popping 4K (3,840-by-2,860-resolution) display, with bright, vivid color and 10-point touch with full gesture support. This puts the resolution ahead of Apple's MacBook Pro with Retina Display (2,800 by 1,800) and the MSI GS60 Ghost Pro 3K$1,923.51 at Amazon(2,880 by 1,620), and puts it on par with the Toshiba P50T-BST2N01 (3,840 by 2,160). The result is a display that will be praised by both 4K fans and graphics-focused professionals like photographers and videographers.

When set side by side with the Apple MacBook Pro, the 4K display easily outshines the Apple's Retina Display, and Asus steps things up further with a richer, wider color gamut. The difference is especially clear when viewing high-resolution imagery and video

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Wolverton: New TV tech focuses on better picture

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Wolverton: New TV tech focuses on better picture

Attendees watch Samsung SUHD TVs at the 2015 International CES at the Las Vegas Convention Center on January 6, 2015. (David Becker/Getty Images)

Attendees watch Samsung SUHD TVs at the 2015 International CES at the Las Vegas Convention Center on January 6, 2015. (David Becker/Getty Images)

Nanosys, the Milpitas company which is one of the two leading producers of quantum dots, says that TVs with the technology can produce 50 percent more colors than typical LCD sets. LCD TVs have generally struggled to reproduce the range of colors in the standard spectrum used for years in broadcast television; with quantum dots, they have the potential to display nearly all of the colors in the much wider next-generation standard for broadcasting, experts say.

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DisplaySearch: Quantum Dot TVs Are Coming

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DisplaySearch: Quantum Dot TVs Are Coming

Makers are ramping up production

SANTA CLARA, CALIF.— Quantum dot TVs are coming on strong, according to DisplaySearch. LCD TVs, using quantum dot technology will become available this year, DisplaySearch said, with 1.3 million shipping worldwide. Shipments of quantum dot TVs are expected to grow to 18.7 million in 2018.

“The launch of new 4K UHD services promises to foment another round of innovation, as content creators bring richer, deeper colors to their art,” said Paul Gray, director of European research at DisplaySearch. “Curved screens are also a popular feature this year, but there will be limited opportunity for growth, as the market for this feature is expected to peak next year.”

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WIRED: What Are Quantum Dots, and Why Do I Want Them in My TV?

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WIRED: What Are Quantum Dots, and Why Do I Want Them in My TV?

Quantum dots glow a specific color when they are hit with any kind of light. Here, a vial of green quantum dots are activated by a blue LED backlight system.

If you look at the CES 2015 word cloud—a neon blob of buzz radiating from the Nevada desert, visible from space—much of it is a retweet of last year’s list. Wearables. 4K. The Internet of Things, still unbowed by its stupid name. Connected cars. HDR. Curved everything. It’s the same-old, same-old, huddled together for their annual #usie at the butt-end of a selfie stick.

But there at the margin, ready to photobomb the shot, is the new kid: quantum dot. It goes by other names, too, which is confusing, and we’ll get to that in a minute. Regardless of what you call it, QD was all over CES this year, rubbing shoulders with the 4K crowd. You may have heard people say it’s all hype. Those people can go pound sand. Quantum dot is gonna be the next big thing in TVs‎, bringing better image quality to cheaper sets.

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TVTechnology: Quantum Dots Make a Scene at the 2015 CES

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TVTechnology: Quantum Dots Make a Scene at the 2015 CES

At the 2015 CES show, Samsung and LG jumped aboard the quantum dot bandwagon, and even experienced broadcasters came away impressed with the brightness, contrast, clarity and color saturation of these displays. So what is quantum dot and what does it mean to viewers and broadcasters?

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WSJ: by 2016 Quantum Dot TVs will out-ship OLEDs by 1 million units

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WSJ: by 2016 Quantum Dot TVs will out-ship OLEDs by 1 million units

LAS VEGAS—The world’s top television makers will this year peddle sets that enhance the color representation of their screens, but postpone a more dramatic shift in technology that promised thinner frames, more energy efficiency and crisper images.

New TVs and prototypes featuring “quantum dot” technology from manufacturers in South Korea, China and Japan took center stage at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas last week, where companies including Samsung Electronics Co. and LG ElectronicsInc. showed off videos with vibrant color.

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Samsung's SUHD Quantum Dot TVs sweep CES with 9 awards

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Samsung's SUHD Quantum Dot TVs sweep CES with 9 awards

Samsung SUHD TVs featuring Quantum Dot technology licensed from Nanosys at CES 2015

Samsung's latest SUHD TVs feature Quantum Dot technology licensed from Nanosys. Some of the awards include:

  • Samsung’s JS9500 TV which received more than eight awards including Ubergizmo’s Best of CES award, Digital Trends’ Best Television at CES 2015 award and Reviewed.com’s 2015 CES Editors’ Choice award.
  • Samsung’s 105-inch UN105S9B TV, the World’s First and Largest Bendable SUHD TV, earned a CES award for Best of Innovation: Video Displays.

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TheVerge names Samsung's SUHD Quantum Dot TV the best TV of CES 2015

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TheVerge names Samsung's SUHD Quantum Dot TV the best TV of CES 2015

Samsung unveiled its stunning S’UHD technology at its keynote this year, but it took legendary designer Yves Behar to help make it an 82-inch reality. With a 21:9 aspect ratio, the S9W is wider than most every TV on the market today, and the difference shows immediately. It rests on an illuminated cube that provides audio and lets you swivel the entire TV. Sadly, Samsung didn't let Behar design the name as well, but this is still the closest a TV has gotten to being a work of art.

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Reviewed.com gives Editor's Choice award to Samsung SUHD Quantum Dot TV at CES 2015!

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Reviewed.com gives Editor's Choice award to Samsung SUHD Quantum Dot TV at CES 2015!

The [Samsung SUHD TV] not only rivals the quality of the company’s best plasmas, it surpasses them altogether.
— Lee Neikirk, Reviewed.com
Samsung JS9500 SUHD Quantum Dot TV at CES 2015 Credit: Reviewed.com

Samsung JS9500 SUHD Quantum Dot TV at CES 2015 Credit: Reviewed.com

Because of the Quantum Dot technology in the panel, the JS9500 boasts roughly 20-30% more color than a standard HDTV. This is the kind of image improvement that's especially hard to quantify with words—seeing is really the best option. Suffice it to say the intensity of the colors leaves a lasting impression.

According to Samsung, the JS9500 is capable of about 92% of the DCI P3 color space, meaning it easily exceeds the color abilities of traditional, non-Quantum Dot HDTVs.

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re/code: SUHD, Quantum Dots and Nano-What? Your Guide to TV Terms for 2015

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re/code: SUHD, Quantum Dots and Nano-What? Your Guide to TV Terms for 2015

Samsung SUHD Quantum Dot TV at CES 2015

Samsung SUHD Quantum Dot TV at CES 2015

If you happened to pay attention to the technology news coming out of the International CES last week, you might have heard that the TV makers introduced their latest and greatest TVs — 4K, SUHD, OLED and LCD — with quantum dot or nanocrystal display technology.

Wait, what?

I’m with you. The new displays shown off at CES were impressive, but their descriptions bordered on ridiculous. Unless you have an advanced degree in quantum physics, you’ll likely be in one of two categories of TV-buying consumers in the coming months: One who casually boasts to his friends that he’s got a “quantum dot TV,” without having any actual understanding of it; or one who stands in front of the shelves at Best Buy, befuddled about what it all means.

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TDR: Quantum Dot Display Component Market will Reach $10.6 Billion by 2025

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TDR: Quantum Dot Display Component Market will Reach $10.6 Billion by 2025

Quantum Dot Display and Lighting Component Market Forecast (2015 to 2025)

In the newly published “Quantum Dot Display and Lighting Technologies and Market Forecast Report” Second Edition, Touch Display Research surveyed many quantum dot suppliers and found that the quantum dot display component market is gaining momentum. Touch Display Research forecasts that the quantum dot display and lighting component market will surpass $2 billion by 2016 and reach $10.6 billion by 2025. This report profiles over sixty companies working on quantum dot materials and quantum dot components.

“Quantum dot technology could improve Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) dramatically in terms of color gamut, color accuracy, and reducing power consumption. This is one of the biggest breakthrough technologies for LCD in recent several years. Cadmium-free quantum dot is entering the market in 2015,” said Dr. Jennifer Colegrove, CEO and principal analyst of Touch Display Research Inc. “We forecast quantum dot components will have a rapid penetration into displays and lighting from 2015 to 2025.”

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From the Lab to Your Digital Device, Quantum Dots Have Made Quantum Leaps

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From the Lab to Your Digital Device, Quantum Dots Have Made Quantum Leaps

Berkeley Lab’s nanotechnology enlivens Nanosys’ displays, enhancing the color and saving energy.

Outside his career as a noted nanochemist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) director Paul Alivisatos is an avid photographer. To show off his photos, his preferred device is a Kindle Fire HDX tablet because “the color display is a whole lot better than other tablets,” he says.

Berkeley Lab director and Nanosys co-founder Paul Alivisatos (Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt/Berkeley Lab)

What he may neglect to mention to the viewer is that not only did he take the photograph, he also helped invent the nanotechnology allowing the viewer to see those brilliant greens, rich reds, and bold blues, all while using significantly less energy. In fact, the Kindle display utilizes a technology manufactured by Nanosys, a startup Alivisatos cofounded in 2001 to commercialize quantum dots.


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