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2012

VentureBeat: Nanosys raises $15M to use ‘quantum dots’ to make displays 50 percent brighter

VentureBeat: Nanosys raises $15M to use ‘quantum dots’ to make displays 50 percent brighter

Nanosys said today it has raised $15 million in a sixth round of funding to expand its manufacturing of materials that enable displays with vivid colors. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based maker of nanotechnology materials — or materials that have unique properties at a scale of a billionth of a meter — will use the investment to expand its manufacturing capacity tenfold. The company makes Quantum Dot Enhancement Film (QDEF), which improves the vividness of color and power efficiency of liquid crystal displays, which are used in everything from tablets to big-screen TVs.

Ken Werner of DisplayDaily: "QDEF lifetime is good enough for consumer television"

Ken Werner of DisplayDaily: "QDEF lifetime is good enough for consumer television"


We can conclude that yes, QDEF lifetime is good enough for consumer television. When are we likely to see it? Perhaps in 2013. Why are we likely to see it? In a frighteningly competitive environment for LCD-TV panels, modules and complete sets, QDEF is a cost-neutral way of giving consumers a change in front-of-screen performance they can readily see, while also providing a modest increase in energy efficiency.

CNET: Nanosys promises better color in tablets, TVs

CNET: Nanosys promises better color in tablets, TVs

A Silicon Valley company is promising to bring more color to LCDs.Nanosys says it has developed a technology that helps deliver 50 percent more color than what's currently available on existing LCD panels. According to the company's site, "that means richer, more viscerally alive reds, a deeper palette of greens, and vivid blues." Most importantly, the company says it can deliver better color with technology already being used in tablets, televisions, and other products.

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Investor's Business Daily: Nanodots may improve displays

Investor's Business Daily: Nanodots may improve displays

Using a layer of nanomaterial can give liquid crystal displays a richer range of colors, according to startup Nanosys. Working with 3M (MMM), Nanosys has developed a film of beads of dots that enable matching the colors used in more expensive organic LEDs, or OLEDS, in a standard LCD without changing the manufacturing process. The company says it's in talks with a notebook maker and that the displays could come to market next year. continue reading

Technology Review: Quantum Dots Give Notebooks a New Glow

Technology Review: Quantum Dots Give Notebooks a New Glow

A layer of nanomaterial that gives a liquid-crystal display the rich range of colors usually possible only with more expensive technologies will be commercialized later this year by the materials giant 3M and Nanosys, a private company in Palo Alto, California. Nanosys representatives say they are in talks with major display manufacturers to adopt the quantum-dot films, and that they will be in a 15.6-inch notebook computer available next year. continue reading

HDTV Expert - Nanosys Quantum Dots Could Save LCD-TV from AMOLEDs

HDTV Expert - Nanosys Quantum Dots Could Save LCD-TV from AMOLEDs

QDEF is a drop-in film that LCD manufacturers can integrate with existing production processes. The version shown at SID consists of a diffuser sheet coated with an appropriate mixture of quantum dots – trillions of them – which are protected from air and moisture by a recently announced barrier film made by 3M. QDEF is literally a drop-in replacement for the diffuser sheet, requiring no change in assembly procedures. But the use of QDEF allows the white LEDs in the backlight to be replaced with less expensive blue LEDs. Nanosys CEO Jason Hartlove has previously stated that the QD approach, in addition to expanding color gamut, produces a modest reduction in power consumption, all at a cost that is comparable to the conventional approach. By narrowing the visual distance between LCDs and OLED displays without harming LCD’s considerable advantage in cost over the short and medium term, QDEF could have a potentially disruptive effect on the developing technology battle between LCDs and AMOLEDs.

Reuters: Search for rare earth substitutes gathers pace

Reuters: Search for rare earth substitutes gathers pace

Rare earths, found in everything from Apple Inc's iPhones to energy-efficient lighting and wind turbines, gained global attention last year as China, which produces more than 90 percent of global supply, repeatedly clamped down on exports. Prices of the individual oxides, alloys and metals soared. Nanosys CEO Jason Hartlove said that even at less-inflated rare earth prices, the cost to make light-emitting diode (LED) products using yttrium, a rare earth, is twice that of Nanosys lighting -- and LEDs are expected ultimately to replace standard light bulbs once they are competitive on price.

"We have an ambition to move into general illumination, probably in the next year or so," said Hartlove.

IEEE: Quantum dots make LCDs brighter and could challenge OLEDs for future TV dominance

IEEE: Quantum dots make LCDs brighter and could challenge OLEDs for future TV dominance

At Display Week, an industry meeting run by the Society for Information Display, quantum-dot developer Nanosys announced that it is working with 3M to commercialize a quantum-dot film that could be integrated into the back of today’s LCD panels. The film could cut the display’s power consumption by half and enable LCDs to generate 50 percent more colors within the range set by the National Television System Committee. Nanosys’s CEO, Jason Hartlove, says that major LCD manufacturers are now testing the film, and a 17-inch notebook incorporating the technology should be on shelves within six months. “We’ve designed this technology to give LCD manufacturers a competitive counterweight to OLEDs,” he says. continue reading

DailyFinance: Who says OLEDs have all the fun?

DailyFinance: Who says OLEDs have all the fun?

3M also took the stage with nanotech expert Nanosys to present an even cooler LCD backlight. Using quantum dot technology on another thin film, the product, christened Quantum Dot Enhancement Film, promises an even more efficient LCD screen architecture where the film amplifies the backlight -- and with 50% better color accuracy than today's top-of-the-line LED-lit displays.

Engadget: Nanosys' eye-popping QDEF inching closer to a display near you

Engadget: Nanosys' eye-popping QDEF inching closer to a display near you

Nanosys' eye-popping QDEF (Quantum Dot Enhancement Film) might be inching closer to a display near you. A new partnership with 3M aims to get the color-loving tech commercialized and into mainstream products. The film uses quantum dots to create an LCD with a wider color gamut -- apparently translating to up to 50 percent more color. The quantum dots are packed onto this film in their trillions (yes, trillions) which is then fitted within the backlight. As the new layer would replace the existing one within LCDs, Nanosys' solution aims to avoid the need for new equipment or processes. However, we're still waiting for high-color QDEF to become that "ecosystem changer" we were promised. continue reading

EE Times: Nanosys teams with 3M film to yield less-costly LCDs

EE Times: Nanosys teams with 3M film to yield less-costly LCDs

Nanosys and the Optical Systems Division of 3M are collaborating to commercialize Nanosys’ Quantum Dot Enhancement Film color LCD technology, which could result in delivering OLED performance to LCDs, at a fraction of the cost and with better energy efficiency.

U.S. Remains Dependent on China for Rare Earth Elements

U.S. Remains Dependent on China for Rare Earth Elements

The U.S. military is almost completely dependent on China for the rare earth elements that go into everything from batteries to precision-guided bombs, according to a report by the Congressional Research Service. Pursuing domestic battery chemistry production is a question of national security. Nanosys is one of only a handful of U.S. companies that make the raw materials for batteries used by the military.

Nanosys SiNANOde battery tech could make batteries three times lighter

Nanosys SiNANOde battery tech could make batteries three times lighter

Industry and military scientists continue the search for lighter and more efficient batteries, with a renewed focus on reducing loads carried by soldiers that affect their mobility and health. Nanosys, a Palo-Alto, Calif., company with 800 patents in nano-scale technologies, is working to create battery materials that are more energy dense than in their natural state.

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The Guardian: Quantum dots will soon be in everything from lightbulbs to laptops

The Guardian: Quantum dots will soon be in everything from lightbulbs to laptops

Backlights for laptops, tablets and mobile devices are next in line, and they should appear in products before the end of 2012 says VJ Sahi, head of corporate development at materials design company Nanosys of Palo Alto, California. Besides the colour advantages, quantum-dot-based backlights can be three times more efficient than traditional backlights. Eventually, says Sahi, quantum dots will do more than just light up displays. The long-term aim is use them to create each red, green and blue sub-pixel that makes up a coloured display. This should produce much brighter colours and consume less power than LCD or even the latest state-of-the-art organic LED (OLED) displays. They should also have no problems with viewing angles, he adds.

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Hometoys Magazine: QDEF Alternative to OLED?

Hometoys Magazine: QDEF Alternative to OLED?

QDEF is a new kind of backlight technology that’s going to enable a new generation of LED backlit TVs that have OLED-like performance at only a fraction of the cost. Display performance is all about light- how much can I generate, how efficiently, how wide a range of colors, and how much resolution can I pack in? QDEF gives LCD makers a way to tune the spectrum of light in the backlight and dramatically improve picture quality. It does this with millions of tiny nanoscrystal phosphors, called “quantum dots.” These “dots” emit light at a very precise wavelength and can be controlled by their size. We use a mix of different color emitting dots to create the perfect backlight for your LCD. The result is richer, more saturated color that’s more true to life.

Nanosys QDEF impressions: It makes an LCD screen as bright and vivid as AMOLED

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Nanosys QDEF impressions: It makes an LCD screen as bright and vivid as AMOLED

Via DigitalTrends's Jeffrey Van Camp We go hands on with a new type of screen technology called QDEF, which can take a standard LCD screen and make the screen twice as colorful and vivid as before, and look as good as AMOLED.

Color quality and brightness has always been a big deal, but with the growing popularity of new screen technologies like AMOLED and Apple’s “retina display,” all manufacturers of tablets, smartphones, computers, and TVs are scrambling to get their hands on the best screen technology available. Unfortunately, OLED and AMOLED can be quite expensive to implement. This is where Nanosys comes in. Using a  new screen technology called QDEF (which can be added to any LCD screen) the company has created screens that can produce 3 times more color than they can today for a price that’s low, and possibly cost neutral for electronics makers.

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CES 2012: Nanosys Redefining "Colorful" In Displays with QDEF Display Technology

CES 2012: Nanosys Redefining "Colorful" In Displays with QDEF Display Technology

For anyone who has looked at an iPad, you probably think that the display is gorgeous. And it is. But it could be even more gorgeous if the colors were spot on. Jeff Yurek of Nanosys met with me at this year's CES to illustrate the difference in the improved quality their technology gives to displays like those on an iPad. And boy is it a difference.