Posts tagged quantum dots
TVT on CES 2019 TVs: "Go Big Or Go Home"

Joseph Palanchar, writing for TVTechnology, interviews Nanosys VP of Sales and Marketing Russell Kempt on CES 2019 and Quantum Dot display technology’s move to the mainstream market:

“As quantum-dot costs fall, added Kempt of quantum-dot supplier Nanosys, “it is now becoming possible for set makers to waterfall the technology across their product lineups.” As a result, by the end of 2018, “we’re beginning to see quantum-dot technology entering the mainstream market for TVs with several 65-inch TV products available below $1,500.”

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Acer Predator X27/ASUS RoG Swift PG27UQ Review Roundup

ASUS and Acer both recently released their new 144hz Quantum Dot Gaming monitor. Both panels are able to deliver an incredible 1,000 nits of peak luminance and lifelike color thanks to the Quantum Dot technology inside. These monitors are among the first products to meet the VESA certified HDR1000 certification.

We're always excited to see great new Quantum Dot products hit the market so we've rounded up some of the most notable excerpts from both monitor reviews below.

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Robert Heron and Patrick Norton discussed the next generation of Nanosys Quantum Dot TV tech

Robert Heron and Patrick Norton discussed the next generation of Nanosys Quantum Dot TV tech on the latest AVexcel podcast.

"Back at Display Week 2018 a few weeks ago, Nanosys, the Quantum Dot masters here in California, they worked out a new technology called QDOG. Which was their Quantum Dot on Glass. One of the things about QDOG in particular was that they were able to produce the Quantum Dot material on a glass plane using printable technology, which was a big deal. It didn't require vacuum chambers and vapor deposition or things like that."

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AVS Forum: Nanosys Quantum Dots at Display Week 2018

Scott Wilkinson writing on AVS Forum giving an update on Nanosys Quantum Dot technology after visiting the Nanosys booth at SID DIsplay Week 2018.

"Nanosys is at the forefront of QD development, as the company clearly demonstrated at the Display Week 2018 conference this week... Quantum dots hold great promise for the future of flat-panel TVs and even microLED displays, and I look forward to bringing you all the latest QD news as I learn it."

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Circuit Cellar: Nanosys Quantum Dot Technology Makes Low-Cost Printing Displays a Reality

Taiwanese tech magazine, Circuit Cellar, looks at how next-generation electroluminescent Quantum Dot technology can fulfill the promise of OLED:

[Translation] While OLED is still working to push their blues to the required level, quantum dot technology has already proven that it is a better luminescent material for this application. Unlike OLED, quantum dots can produce the required blue light without any physical limitations. Also, quantum dots are made of durable inorganic material to provide better stability under oxygen and water vapor. [...]

This technology may take up to three to five years to commercialize. Nanosys is currently working on reducing the cost and finding a way to make it compatible standard materials. To achieve this, Nanosys will not be using the standard semiconductor manufacturing process for this application and instead, they will be using inkjet-printing.”

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Yole Développement: Quantum Dot Displays Set to Lead Wide Colour Gamut TV Market

According to Yole Développement, Quantum Dot TVs are set to dominate and lead the wide color gamut TV market. Driven by the availability of high volume QD production from Nanosys and it's extended supply chain, TV makers can rapidly adopt the benefits of Quantum Dots

"With the rapidly improving performance and decreasing cost of quantum dots, enhanced LCD displays will be able to take advantage of an upcoming window of limited production for organic LED (OLED) displays – the other main contender capable of delivering wide colour gamut and high dynamic range – and become widely adopted in mid-high range television displays, thus capturing the majority of the wide colour gamut TV market.

OLEDs require the building of entire new production facilities to incorporate into televisions, creating high cost and technology barriers that make it challenging for companies to enter OLED television panel production."

"With the rapidly improving performance and decreasing cost of quantum dots, enhanced LCD displays will be able to take advantage of an upcoming window of limited production for organic LED (OLED) displays – the other main contender capable of delivering wide colour gamut and high dynamic range – and become widely adopted in mid-high range television displays, thus capturing the majority of the wide colour gamut TV market.

OLEDs require the building of entire new production facilities to incorporate into televisions, creating high cost and technology barriers that make it challenging for companies to enter OLED television panel production."

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Samsung Introduces 88-inch QLED TV

Samsung introduced their new 88-inch QLED TV with Quantum Dots in it. The TV is targeted for the premium TV market and will cost 33 million won (US$29,424).

"Samsung said the quantum dot technology, which utilizes a film of semiconductor nanocrystals to boast far more vivid colors than liquid crystal displays (LCDs), is capable of enhancing viewers' experiences.

The tech giant also applied metalcoating to the quantum dot nanocrystals to develop what it calls "metal quantum dot" technology."

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Nanocrystals in their prime

Research into nanocrystals has recently been translated into the production of commercial devices. In May 2011, the company Nanosys announced a product called the Quantum Dot Enhancement Film6. This is a thin layer of quantum dots that convert the blue light of a GaN light-emitting diode into bright colours and can be used in liquid-crystal displays. Furthermore, the Amazon Kindle uses quantum dot technology for enhanced definition.

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Forbes: Apple Paving The Way To 'Revolutionary' iPhone Display with Quantum Dots

Display experts, Displaymate, say QDs will revolutionize LCD displays over the next five years, bringing them on a par with the OLED screens favored by Apple’s main competitor.

Quantum Dot is an enhancement film layer that improves the color performance of LCD screens, like the Retina. It can also be used to enhance the color performance of TVs. Quantum Dot technology has the advantage of being able to work with existing display production lines – it’s a drop-in technology with no significant capital investment required.

What’s doubly interesting is that there are already  quantum dot technologies on the market. I wrote back in the summer that inventors Nanosys and fabricator 3M were ready to roll with quantum dot enhancement film (QDEF).

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DisplayMate: 2014 Innovative Displays and Display Technologies Smartphones, Tablets, TVs, and Wearable Displays

In 2014 the most significant development for high-end LCDs will be the increased adoption of Quantum Dots by many more manufacturers, which will improve the Color Gamut, Color Accuracy, display power efficiency, brightness and/or the running time on battery for mobile displays.

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CNET: Apple needs to catch Samsung, Amazon in displays, Quantum Dots the key innovation

"Apple has recently given up the lead in displays -- now Amazon, Google, LG, and Samsung are launching products with the best and most innovative displays."

He cited the example of an emerging LCD technology called Quantum Dots that Amazon has tapped for the Kindle Fire HDX 7 (now $199 at Amazon).

"Quantum Dots are going to revolutionize and reenergize LCDs for the next 5+ years," he wrote. "While they have been under development for many years, in 2013 they made it out of the labs and into consumer products: in some models of Sony Bravia TVs...and in the Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 7, with Quantum Dots from Nanosys," he said.

Quantum Dot displays produce highly saturated primary colors that are similar to those produced by OLED displays, according to Soneira.

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"Quantum Dots are going to revolutionize and reenergize LCDs for the next 5+ years," Dr. Ray Soneira of DisplayMate

Quantum Dots provide an amazing super high technology performance enhancement for LCDs through a unique application of Quantum Physics. By incorporating them within the Backlight the LCDs then produce highly saturated primary colors that are similar to those produced by OLED displays, plus they also improve the brightness and power efficiency at the same time. Instead of using existing White LEDs (which have yellow phosphors) that produce a broad light spectrum that makes it hard to efficiently produce saturated colors, Quantum Dots directly convert the light from Blue LEDs into highly saturated narrow band primary colors for LCDs. And the icing on the cake is that their colors are precisely tunable during manufacture, which means they can produce the exact colors needed for high image and picture color accuracy. This eliminates the lopsided Color Gamuts and White Point errors that are present in most existing displays.

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HDTV Expert on CES 2014: Red really looks like red when viewed with a Quantum Dot backlight

Red – perhaps the most difficult color to reproduce accurately in any flat-screen TV – really looks like red when viewed with a QD backlight. And it’s possible to show many subtle shades of red with this technology.

All you need is a QD film or emitter with arrays of red and green dots, plus a backlight made up of blue LEDs. The blue passes through, while the blue photons “tickle” the red and green dots, causing them to emit their respective colors. It’s also possible to build a direct-illumination display out of quantum dots that would rival OLED TVs.

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Touch Display Research Forecasts Quantum Dot Display and Lighting Component Market to Reach $9.6 Billion by 2023

“Quantum dot could improve Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) dramatically in terms of color gamut, color accuracy and reducing power consumption. This is one of the biggest breakthrough technologies for LCD in recent several years. Now quantum dot LCD is challenging AMOLED,” said Dr. Jennifer Colegrove, president and analyst of Touch Display Research Inc. “We forecast quantum dot components will have a rapid penetration into LCDs from 2014 to 2023.”

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